What happens if I don't get through all my new cards for a day?

sherrbear's Avatar

sherrbear

18 Feb, 2014 03:52 PM

I tried searching for this and couldn't find a good answer.

Currently, I have Anki set to show me 20 new cards a day. However, there's a good chance that as time passes I won't be able to cram 20 more cards into my brain each day, due to the sheer amount of material on each card. I know that I CAN edit how many new cards I get, but what if I don't edit it?

So, say one day I only get through 10 of the cards. The next day, will Anki realize I only got through 10 and start my 20 cards where I left off? Or will it still default to the next 20 cards and just skip over the 10 I never got to?

  1. 1 Posted by Aleksej on 18 Feb, 2014 04:19 PM

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    1. http://ankisrs.net/docs/manual.html#falling-behind
    2. "sheer amount of material on each card."? You probably should edit not the limit, but the cards themselves. Split them into many cards. As the Anki manual says about hint fields, "Please have a read about the minimum information principle on http://www.supermemo.com/articles/20rules.htm before proceeding."
  2. 2 Posted by Aleksej on 18 Feb, 2014 04:23 PM

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    Re: your actual question though: the limit applies to the number of times Anki introduces you to a card from the card queue the first time. There is no pointer in that queue that changes to track where you stopped.

  3. 3 Posted by sherrbear on 18 Feb, 2014 04:32 PM

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    Unfortunately, splitting the material into multiple cards is not an option. For my exam, a question will literally ask you to regurgitate a list like this for a question:

    Design Features and Pricing Considerations for Older Versions of Term
    Products

    Product Design / Features
    Coverage for a limited time period Death Benefit – Typically level Premiums – Level, increasing, or decreasing Conversions – Allow conversion to permanent plan Re-entry Term - re-qualify for select rates

    Pricing Considerations
    Mortality – lower than permanent insurance Persistency – affects mortality and recoverability of acquisition costs Compensation – Lower due to low premiums Expenses – large % of premium; allocation matters Profit Goals – Profit Margin, IRR, Breakeven Year

    I have 480 cards like this to memorize.

  4. 4 Posted by Aleksej on 18 Feb, 2014 04:46 PM

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    The SuperMemo site has some suggestions on formulating cards to memorize various kinds of material.

    I guess you are going to use mnemonics and smaller cards to memorize individual pieces of the knowledge contained in the big ones? I suppose it's an exception from useful cards being small (similar to memorization of poems), but hopefully the cards are more long than difficult.

    Maybe you'll be able to publish your own examples of dealing with lists somewhere. :-)

  5. 5 Posted by Heather on 18 Feb, 2014 06:00 PM

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    And to answer your basic questions - ANKI isn't going to skip new cards - if you say you want 20 new cards but only do 10 of them, then the next day it will continue where you left off.

  6. 6 Posted by Elsa on 19 Feb, 2014 10:54 AM

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    Trying to learn that many facts on a single card is a BAD, BAD idea. Let's say you forget one element - how do you rate the card? How would you rate a card you got 50% of right? What about 20%? This will just confuse the algorithm.
    I tried doing that with exam questions (and stuck to it for 2 years). My cards were much smaller, with 4-5 items on each. Reviewing was boring, messy and inefficient.

    I would heavily cloze delete the example you gave (this is what I do now to learn biology/psychology/history/literature). Since the list is particularly long, I would create more than one note, and cloze delete each one at a higher level. This way, once you have learned individual items, you can learn them in groups too, and work your way up so you can recall the whole card easily.

    Your card is mostly Greek to me, so this is probably not the most sensible way to cloze delete it, but here you go:

    Product Design / Features
    {{c1::Coverage}} {{c2::for a limited time period}} {{c3::Death Benefit}} – {{c4::Typically level}} {{c5::Premiums}} – {{c6::Level, increasing, or decreasing}} {{c7::Conversions}} – Allow {{c8::conversion to permanent plan}} {{c9::Re-entry Term}} - {{c10::re-qualify}} for {{c11::select rates}} ...etc

    (don't forget the title; I wasn't sure if clozing it made sense)

    Then, in another note, you make larger groups:
    {{c1::Coverage for a limited time period}} Death Benefit – {{c4::Typically level Premiums}} ...etc

    (I left "Death Benefit" out as is it already clozed in the first note)

    ...and you keep making new notes with larger groups until you feel satisfied you will be able to recall the whole thing in one block (for example when prompted with the title).

    Creating the cards should be fairly fast using cloze delete; reviewing will take time, but you have A LOT of info to memorise anyway, and anything that takes less time than SRSing in this case is not going to be as efficient. Additionally, each card should be easy enough to make reviewing rewarding in itself.

    On a more "technical" note, you don't even have to use multiple notes; you can keep all of this info on one note if you edit the template. Add one new field like "Text" per "note" (let's call it "Text2") and then make sure you have this on the back and front of each card:
    {{cloze:Text}}{{cloze:Text2}} This will only show Text or Text2 depending on which field the current cloze is in. I assume you can have as many as you want.

  7. 7 Posted by vokietis on 19 Feb, 2014 12:53 PM

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    It’s simply not true that, “ splitting the material into multiple cards is not an option.” Even if your question is literally,

    “Design Features and Pricing Considerations for Older Versions of Term
    Products”,

    you may still remember design features on the one hand and pricing considerations on the other hand seperately.
    (Think of the famous Animaniacs question about “The names of all 50 states and their capitals.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MqsC92SxcA You’d probably have a card asking for all states with A as first letter, then B as first letter [with the answer “there aren’t any”], and so forth. To recall them all when asked, you just have to go through the alphabet. For the capitals, you’d have one card for each state.)

    Your cards are thus easily split into:

    Card A:

    Q: Design Features for older versions of Term products?
    A: Coverage for a limited time period Death Benefit – Typically level Premiums – Level, increasing, or decreasing Conversions – Allow conversion to permanent plan Re-entry Term - re-qualify for select rates

    Card B:

    Q: Pricing Considerations for older versions of Term products?
    A: Mortality – lower than permanent insurance Persistency – affects mortality and recoverability of acquisition costs Compensation – Lower due to low premiums Expenses – large % of premium; allocation matters Profit Goals – Profit Margin, IRR, Breakeven Year

    If I understood what you’re talking about in the answers, I’d make a suggestion how to split up these cards further. If the items in the answers may be grouped, e.g. “Pricing considerations that depend on mortality” etc., you may build your cards upon this group, in a very similar way to what I illustrated in the United States example.

  8. 8 Posted by sherrbear on 19 Feb, 2014 01:07 PM

    sherrbear's Avatar

    Thanks for your input guys. While the sample card I listed can be split into two cards, for other cards there isn't any way to split:

    Characteristics of Survivorship Insurance

    Pays death benefit on the second death; Can take the form of UL, traditional Par WL, and excess interest WL; single status vs dual status; joint age calculations; substandards and uninsurables; flexibility is important - death benefits and premiums; competitive, sophisticated, affluent market; common riders - policy split, estate preservation, first-to-die term, automatic increase in death benefit; sold in the estate planning and business insurance market

    An exam question may ask me to describe survivorship insurance and I'd have to be able to recall all of those at once. Most of the cards are similar to this one, where all the items refer to a single topic.

    Another important fact that I forgot to mention is that I didn't make these cards - they were provided by the exam committee in a format we're expected to be able to recall information in. Since they're in an image format, I'm also unable to modify them unless I wanted to sit here and type up every single card.

    As for how I rate the cards, I only rate it as easy if I was able to recall all the points. Good means I got all the points but had to think about them. Hard means I missed anything. The exams are so difficult that absolute memorization is required so I can't settle for anything less than perfect recall.

    For those of you thinking that it's impossible - it's not! Actuaries are known for taking these difficult tests. The exam committee recommends spending 150 hours just memorizing the flashcards alone, let alone learning the material behind the cards. So yes, while the task ahead of me is monumental, I have at least 150 hours to devote to it. There's a reason we're the #1 job in the country :-)

  9. 9 Posted by Aleksej on 19 Feb, 2014 01:21 PM

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    As for how I rate the cards, I only rate it as easy if I was able to recall all the points. Good means I got all the points but had to think about them. Hard means I missed anything. The exams are so difficult that absolute memorization is required so I can't settle for anything less than perfect recall.

    Then note that unless you edit the Interval modifier, Anki targets about 90% chance of Good recall. http://ankisrs.net/docs/manual.html#reviews

  10. 10 Posted by Aleksej on 19 Feb, 2014 01:23 PM

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    …Anki targets about 90% chance of Good recall, but if you create more cards containing pieces of the information in the big cards, you can review the harder parts additionally more often than the easier parts.

  11. 11 Posted by Aleksej on 19 Feb, 2014 01:28 PM

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    (Sorry if my sentence is illogical; I intended to say that the chance will be bigger, but noticed that the big card will be shown less often, so for individual cards it could be the same.)

  12. 12 Posted by Aleksej on 19 Feb, 2014 01:32 PM

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    Anki targets about 90% chance of Good recall.

    And this is also an error: it targets 90% chance of non-Again recall, i.e. Hard, Good or Easy.

  13. 13 Posted by Elsa on 19 Feb, 2014 02:23 PM

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    For those of you thinking that it's impossible - it's not! Actuaries are known for taking these difficult tests. The exam committee recommends spending 150 hours just memorizing the flashcards alone, let alone learning the material behind the cards. So yes, while the task ahead of me is monumental, I have at least 150 hours to devote to it. There's a reason we're the #1 job in the country :-)

    I don't think anyone here suggested it was impossible. I suspect anyone with a long-term interest in memory (or any medical student) would agree this is far from being monumental.
    We have also demonstrated 2 different ways of splitting those cards. It IS possible.

    Why would you want to learn those cards in the hardest possible fashion (minus crippled spaced repetition)? There is no glory in doing something the hard way. Use Anki (and possibly other memory techniques) as best as you can and that will leave you plenty of time to master the cards you have more trouble with. Brute-force the cards into your head and you unlikely to know them all perfectly - especially after only 150 hours (that's not even 20 minutes per card).

  14. 14 Posted by vokietis on 19 Feb, 2014 03:16 PM

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    I still recommend splitting cards, in comparison with a two-way learning technique:

    1. For good long-term retention of facts, use Anki with minimum information. I try my very best to understand what your card is about and give you an impression of how a split card might look like. Note, however, that I do not include all the information on your card, but that’t just because I do not understand part of it.

    Card 1:
    Q: Categories for Characteristics of Survivorship Insurance
    A: Payment characteristics; form; different types; market characteristics; legal aspects.

    Card 2:
    Q: Payment characteristics of Survivorship Insurance
    A: Pays death benefit on the second death; flexibility is important - death benefits and premiums

    Card 2:
    Q: Form of Survivorship Insurance
    A: Can take the form of UL, traditional Par WL, and excess interest WL

    Card 3:
    Q: Different types of Survivorship Insurance
    A: single status vs dual status; joint age calculations; substandards and uninsurables

    Card 4:
    Q: Market Charakteristics of Survivorship Insurance
    A: competitive, sophisticated, affluent market

    Card 5:
    Q:Legal aspects of Survivorship Insurance
    A: common riders - policy split, estate preservation, first-to-die term, automatic increase in death benefit

    You will find better categories than I did, because you know the matter.

    1. For actual training for the test, print the cards in an image format (or use a different deck) and study them in your all-or-nothing fashion. You’ll notice that you’ll recall the cards much easier since you already provided structure for them at the moment you were adapting them for step 1.
  15. System closed this discussion on 22 Feb, 2016 11:40 PM.

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